Donald Trump dismisses Michael Bloomberg’s White House bid
November 9, 2019
header-image

A majority of Americans don’t approve of Donald Trump’s presidency as the Republican leader marks three years in the role.

Trump defied the polls to be elected as US President in 2016 and it appears he will need to do so again next year.

According to Newsweek, the President is suffering historically weak approval ratings. After he was elected, those ratings were on Trump’s side when 44.3 per cent of Americans surveyed said they approved of him, while 44.2 per cent said they didn’t.

President Donald Trump points to supporters after speaking at his Black Voices for Trump rally. Picture: APSource:AP

Newly elected Presidents traditionally enjoy high approval ratings. Trump did too, but they failed to last.

According to the publication, those who don’t like Trump or the job he is doing, have remained solidly against him since their early peak.

He has been consistently met with a disapproval rating of below 50 per cent on average.

However those polls don’t sum up sentiment in the battleground states, where the 2020 election will be won.

MORE NEWS: Britain savaged by fatal floods

Student death pushed Hong Kong to the brink

President Donald Trump supporter Tony Smith, right, of College Park, yells "Trump 2020" in a crowd of anti-Trump protestors as they rally outside of the Georgia World Congress Center in downtown Atlanta. Picture: APSource:AP

TRUMP MOCKS ‘LITTLE BILLIONAIRE’

That news came after President Trump mocked “little” billionaire and former New York mayor Michael Bloomberg, saying his potential opponent for the 2020 election would fail if he joined the race.

“He doesn’t have the magic to do well … Little Michael will fail,” Trump told reporters at the White House as he headed to the southern state of Georgia to rally support.

United Nations Secretary-general envoy for climate action Michael Bloomberg delivers a speech in Brussels. Picture: AFPSource:AFP

Bloomberg, 77, is expected to enter the race Friday to become the Democratic nominee for US president, setting up a showdown with fellow septuagenarian Joe Biden as the leading centrist candidate.

He is expected to file paperwork in at least one state declaring himself a candidate, according to multiple outlets including The New York Times.

Bloomberg had said back in March he wouldn’t run, but more recently has been toying with the idea of throwing his hat in the ring, according to an Adviser.

Michael Bloomberg is preparing to enter the crowded race to become the Democratic nominee for the 2020 presidential election. Picture: AFPSource:AFP

He sent members of staff to Alabama to gather the signatures required to register for its primary ahead of the deadline Friday in anticipation of a bid, the reports said.

Bloomberg Adviser Howard Wolfson said in a statement that the billionaire wanted to ensure that the job of defeating Trump was seen through in 2020.

“He’s not going to do well, but I think he’s going to hurt Biden actually,” Trump added.

“There’s nobody I’d rather run against than Little Michael.”

HOW BLOOMBERG WOULD CHANGE THE RACE

If Bloomberg were to launch a campaign, it could dramatically reshape the Democratic contest less than three months before primary voting begins.

The 77-year-old has spent the past few weeks talking with prominent Democrats about the state of the 2020 field, expressing concerns about the steadiness of former Vice President Joe Biden’s campaign and the rise of liberal Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren, according to people with knowledge of those discussions.

In recent days, he took steps to keep his options open, including moving to get on the primary ballot in Alabama ahead of the state’s Friday filing deadline.

Michael Bloombeg is said to be concerned about the rise of progressive Massachusetts senator Elizabeth Warren.Source:AFP

In a statement on Thursday, Bloomberg adviser Howard Wolfson said the former mayor believes Trump “represents an unprecedented threat to our nation” and must be defeated.

“But Mike is increasingly concerned that the current field of candidates is not well positioned to do that,” Wolfson said.

Bloomberg’s moves come as the Democratic race enters a crucial phase. Biden’s frontrunner status has been vigorously challenged by Warren and Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, who are flush with cash from small-dollar donors.

But both are viewed by some Democrats as too liberal to win in a general election face-off with Trump.

Despite a historically large field, some Democrats anxious about defeating Trump have been looking for other options.

Former Attorney-General Eric Holder and former Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick have quietly had conversations with supporters urging them to consider a run, but neither appears likely to get in the race.

Bernie Sanders is viewed by some Democrats as too liberal to win in a general election face-off with Trump. Picture: APSource:AP

Bloomberg, a Republican-turned-independent who registered as a Democrat last year, has flirted with a presidential run before but ultimately backed down, including in 2016.

He endorsed Hillary Clinton in that race and, in a speech at the Democratic Party convention, pummeled Trump as a con who has oversold his business successes.

Bloomberg plunged his efforts and his money into gun control advocacy and climate change initiatives. He again looked seriously at a presidential bid earlier this year, travelling to early voting states and conducting extensive polling, but decided not to run in part because of Biden’s perceived strength.

Biden did not address Bloomberg’s potential candidacy at a fundraiser Thursday night in Boston.

Joe Biden, embracing Barack Obama, did not address Bloomberg’s potential candidacy at a fundraiser Thursday night in Boston. Picture: APSource:News Limited

With immense personal wealth, Bloomberg could quickly build out a robust campaign operation across the country.

Still, his advisers acknowledge that his late entry to the race could make competing in states like Iowa and New Hampshire, which have been blanketed by candidates for nearly a year, difficult.

Instead, they previewed a strategy that would focus more heavily on the March 3 “Super Tuesday” contests, including in delegate-rich California.

Some Democrats were sceptical there would be a groundswell of interest in the former New York mayor.

“There are smart and influential people in the Democratic Party who think a candidate like Bloomberg is needed,” said Jennifer Palmieri, who advised Clinton’s 2016 campaign. “But there is zero evidence that rank-and-file voters in the early states of Iowa and New Hampshire feel the same.”

Still, others credited Bloomberg with taking on “some of America’s biggest challenges” and finding success.

Michael Bloomberg, long touted as a possible US presidential candidate, is getting ready to battle it out with President Donald Trump. Picture: AFPSource:AFP

“While this is not an endorsement, Michael Bloomberg is a friend and I admire his track record as a successful business leader and Mayor who finds practical solutions to some of America’s biggest challenges, from creating good jobs to addressing the opioid crisis and fighting for commonsense gun safety,” said Rhode Island Gov. Gina Raimondo, a Democrat.

Bloomberg reached out to several prominent Democrats on Thursday, including Raimondo. One Democrat Bloomberg hasn’t spoken to as he’s reconsidered his run is former President Barack Obama.

The billionaire class is scared and they should be scared.

Bloomberg would pose an immediate ideological challenge to Biden, who is running as a moderate and hopes to appeal to independents and Republicans who have soured on Trump. But the billionaire media mogul with deep Wall Street ties could also energise supporters of Warren and Sanders, who have railed against income inequality and have vowed to ratchet up taxes on the wealthiest Americans.

“He’s a literal billionaire entering the race to keep the progressives from winning,” said Rebecca Katz, a New York-based liberal Democratic strategist.

“He is the foil.” Warren on Thursday tweeted: “Welcome to the race, (at) MikeBloomberg!” and linked to her campaign website, saying he would find there “policy plans that will make a huge difference for working people and which are very popular.”

Welcome to the race, @MikeBloomberg! If you're looking for policy plans that will make a huge difference for working people and which are very popular, start here: https://t.co/6UMSAf90NT

Bloomberg would face other challenges as well, particularly scrutiny of his three terms as mayor.

He has defended the New York Police Department’s use of the controversial stop-and-frisk policy that has been criticised as targeting African-Americans and Hispanics.

Black voters in particular are one of the most powerful constituencies in Democratic politics.

Bloomberg will have to move quickly in the coming days and weeks to get on the ballot in many of the primary states, including Alabama.

New Hampshire’s filing deadline is Nov. 15.

MORE NEWS

Hidden Mexican drug labs bringing meth 2.0 to Australia

Bushfires intensify: people trapped in homes

Wife identifies man’s arm found in shark

Michael Bloomberg is said to have not spoken yet with Barack Obama about his presidential run. Picture: APSource:AP

In Arkansas, another Super Tuesday state, a Democratic Party spokesman said a person representing a “mystery candidate” reached out Thursday afternoon asking about the requirements to join the ballot. Reed Brewer, communications director for the Arkansas Democrats, said he walked the individual through the process – which simply requires filing documentation with both the state party and secretary of state, as well as paying a $2,500 fee – and was assured that the fee would be “no problem” for the mystery candidate.

There is no filing requirement for a candidate to run in the Iowa caucuses, which are a series of Democratic Party meetings, not state-run elections.

It means a candidate can enter the race for the Feb. 3 lead-off contest at any time.